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Latest World news news, comment and analysis from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice
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    The national media failed to cover large swathes of the US pre-election, while rural voices have been quieted by the decimation of local news. Our On The Ground project aims to remedy these issues

    Sarah Smarsh is a journalist, but she’s not typical, at least not by national media standards. For starters, she’s a fifth-generation Kansan who grew up below the poverty line, feeding livestock and helping grow wheat on a small farm. She got her first taste for investigation and justice by following her grandmother, a probation officer, at the county courthouse in Wichita.

    Growing up, she rarely read about people she knew – farmers, carpenters, factory and restaurant workers – in the mainstream media. After more than 15 years covering Kansas politics and culture on the ground, she’s more committed than ever to her home, and to people often stereotyped or misunderstood in national coverage.

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    Analysis: The president celebrated the decision to allow parts of the ban to take effect, but ultimately, ‘the president might well lose on this’, says a legal expert

    Donald Trump was quick to proclaim victory when the supreme court decided to allow elements of one of his most controversial policies to take effect before justices hear the case in the fall.

    “Today’s unanimous Supreme Court decision is a clear victory for our national security,” the US president said in a statement. “It allows the travel suspension for the six terror-prone countries and the refugee suspension to become largely effective.”

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    China is setting up agricultural centres across Africa, but in Zambia – where the majority of farmers are female smallholders – few women get the chance to learn

    On the highway heading towards Chongwe, 15km south-east of Lusaka, the red Chinese lettering, high flagpoles and gleaming modern architecture of the Zambia Chinese Agricultural Technology Demonstration Centre (ZATDC) stand out amid the vast fields of maize.

    It is one of 25 such centres built across the continent as part of a grand plan to bring agricultural training to local people, helping them produce better crops with higher yields, so that food security is improved for everyone.

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    A number of people have died and more than 30 remain missing after a ferry sank in Guatape, Colombia on Sunday. Footage of the sinking shows tourist boats rushing to the aid of passengers on the vessel as it disappears below the water line

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    German chancellor plans to make climate change, free trade and mass migration key themes in Hamburg, putting her on collision course with US

    A clash between Angela Merkel and Donald Trump appears unavoidable after Germany signalled that it will make climate change, free trade and the management of forced mass global migration the key themes of the G20 summit in Hamburg next week.

    The G20 summit brings together the world’s biggest economies, representing 85% of global gross domestic product (GDP), and Merkel’s chosen agenda looks likely to maximise American isolation while attempting to minimise disunity amongst others.

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    May seeks to make Europeans reasonably welcome … more high-rises fail on safety … heroes soften theme park plunge

    Good morning to you. Graham Russell here with what’s happening at the start of the week.

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    Data reveals there are 150 to 180 animals in Finland, where government awards licences to hunt them

    Conservation groups have raised concerns over Finland’s wild wolf population after a new census found numbers far below those regarded as naturally sustainable.

    Data from the Finnish National Resources Institute show there are currently only about 150 to 180 wolves living in Finland, where the government awards licences to hunt the animals.

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    PM Shinzo Abe concerned about impact on Japanese firms with UK operations if Britain leaves the single market

    Japan wants to hold early free trade talks with Britain, in a sign of growing concern among the country’s businesses over post-Brexit access to the European market.

    Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abe, is hoping to soften the blow that Britain’s expected withdrawal from the single market could inflict on Japanese companies by starting informal talks on free trade before Britain leaves the EU, the Nikkei business newspaper said, citing unnamed sources.

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    A book of poems published in 2012 by Liu Xiaobo, the Chinese dissident released from prison on Monday, contained a moving tribute to his wife, the poet Liu Xia

    To Xia

    My dear,
    I'll never give up the struggle for freedom from the oppressors'
    jail, but I'll be your willing prisoner for life.

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    Liu was awarded Nobel peace prize in 2010 while serving 11-year sentence for inciting subversion of state power

    China’s best-known political prisoner, the civil rights campaigner and Nobel peace prize winner Liu Xiaobo, has been released on medical parole after he was diagnosed with terminal liver cancer.

    Liu, 61, is in the late stages of the disease, said Mo Shaoping, his lawyer, who has been in contact with Liu’s family. Liu is being treated at a hospital in the north-eastern city of Shenyang, near where he was being held. Another of Liu’s lawyers, Shang Baojun, said he was diagnosed in May.

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  • 06/26/17--03:45: The battle for Mosul in maps
  • Iraqi forces supported by a US-led coalition have been fighting to take back Iraq’s second city from Islamic State since 16 October 2016

    In June 2014, when the leader of Isis, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, declared a global caliphate, he did it from Mosul, Iraq’s second city. Isis rapidly expanded its territory in Iraq and Syria throughout that year, but has since been gradually pushed back, partly due to US-led airstrikes. Losing Mosul now could spell the end of the jihadi group’s ability to control large swaths of Iraq.

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    Timothy Morton wants humanity to give up some of its core beliefs, from the fantasy that we can control the planet to the notion that we are ‘above’ other beings. His ideas might sound weird, but they’re catching on

    Read the text version here

    Subscribe via Audioboom, iTunes, Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Acast& Sticherand join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

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    Former archbishop of Canterbury steps down as honorary assistant bishop following report critical of church’s ‘collusion’ with abuser Peter Ball

    George Carey, the former archbishop of Canterbury, has resigned as honorary assistant bishop in the diocese of Oxford following a damning independent report criticising the Church of England’s handling of a high-profile sex abuse case.

    Carey, 81, quit after Justin Welby, the current archbishop of Canterbury, made the unprecedented decision to ask him to “carefully consider his position”. The report concluded the church had “colluded [with the abuser] rather than seeking to help those he had harmed”.

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    Officials from the most isolated nation on Earth have just completed a tour of Spain’s Costa Blanca, with an eye towards creating their own Mediterranean-style resort. What could possibly go wrong?

    Name: Benidorm.

    Age: Its first charter was awarded in 1325, but the area has been settled since 3000BC.

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  • 06/26/17--08:31: Lord Joffe obituary
  • Lawyer who helped Nelson Mandela escape the death penalty

    As the instructing solicitor for Nelson Mandela’s defence team at the Rivonia trial of 1963-64, Joel Joffe, later Lord Joffe, who has died aged 85, played a key role in helping the future South African president and others avoid the death penalty. That was the severest sentence that could have resulted from being convicted of sabotage, and Mandela described Joffe as “the general behind the scenes in our defence”.

    Charges followed a police raid in July 1963 on Liliesleaf Farm in the Johannesburg suburb of Rivonia, where Mandela and his anti-apartheid co-conspirators – including Govan Mbeki, Walter Sisulu, Lionel “Rusty” Bernstein, Andrew Mlangeni, Ahmed Kathrada and Dennis Goldberg– had been plotting the overthrow of the government. Mandela was already in jail for another offence and was indicted later.

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    Treatment of dying Nobel peace prize winner is emblematic of China’s iron rule. Tania Branigan on the remarkable man she nearly met – the day he was arrested

    There was no sign of Liu Xiaobo in the Beijing coffee shop – a confusion over the place or time we had arranged to meet, I assumed. But he wasn’t answering his mobile phone and a call to his home brought worrying news: 10 police had arrived late the night before and taken him away.

    Even then, the writer’s disappearance did not seem overly concerning. Chinese dissidents and activists were used to pressure from the authorities and brief detentions for questioning, or worse. But Liu enjoyed a relative degree of tolerance because of his high profile, though he’d been jailed over 1989’s Tiananmen Square pro-democracy protests when he helped broker a peaceful exit from the square for the remaining demonstrators amid the bloody crackdown – and again in the 90s.

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    The government will continue to prosecute anyone who attacks citizens, regardless of faith, occupation or lifestyle, writes Nazmul Quaunine, high commissioner of Bangladesh to the UK

    Your editorial (Bangladesh’s vicious politics do a disservice to its people, 19 June) inaccurately blames the government of Bangladesh for violence committed during its 2014 general election. The violence was instigated by individuals associated with the opposition Bangladesh National party, including its leader, Khaleda Zia, and her son, Tarique Rahman. But the political affiliation of these people had nothing to do with the criminal accusations against them. Bangladesh proudly upholds the rule of law no matter what political party the perpetrators belong to. The government began battling Islamic extremism long before last summer’s tragic Holey Artisan Bakery attack, including by arresting the criminals who attacked bloggers and intellectuals. Law enforcement authorities are providing protection to 499 citizens who have requested it and have never denied protection to those who request it. In addition, police are helping citizens to improve the security of their homes. The government will continue to prosecute anyone who attacks citizens, regardless of faith, occupation or lifestyle. To underscore the point, the government is providing police protection to Sultana Kamal, a Bangladeshi lawyer in Dhaka, who was recently threatened by non-government Islamist groups.
    Nazmul Quaunine
    High commissioner of Bangladesh to the UK

    • Join the debate – email guardian.letters@theguardian.com

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    T Douglas Reilly draws on his experience with the International Atomic Energy Agency to praise the Iran nuclear deal, while David Gleeson wonders why Tehran is so often cast as the villain on the world stage

    The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), also known as the Iran nuclear deal) is excellent; it is far better and more extensive than I ever expected (Don’t upset the balance of power in the Middle East, 23 June). If followed by all parties, it blocks all avenues for Iran to develop nuclear explosives. To be sure, it is vehemently opposed by Israel’s prime minister Netanyahu and Republicans in Congress.

    I am a physicist who worked in nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation for 38 years at the Los Alamos national laboratory; the majority of my efforts were for and with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) that has the responsibility of inspecting the nuclear facilities of states signatory to the nuclear non-proliferation treaty (NPT). Among other things, I developed programmes that have been part of the initial IAEA inspectors’ training since 1980. I’ve trained many of the inspectors who inspect Iran today, and have inspected Iran’s facilities since it signed and ratified the NPT shortly after it came into force in 1970. 

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    MPs raise fears that Conservative deal with DUP may scupper free terminations in UK for women from Northern Ireland

    MPs have warned that abortion rights for Northern Irish women travelling to the UK for a termination must be addressed despite the Conservative deal with the DUP, repeatedly raising their concerns during a heated debate in the Commons.

    Labour MP Stella Creasy and Conservative MP Anna Soubry were among those who called on the government to permit Northern Irish women terminations in England without charge.

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    New two-day festival Antidote will focus on finding solutions to some of the world’s most intractable problems

    The Sydney Opera House has announced a new “ideas, art and action” festival will debut this September, replacing the annual Festival of Dangerous Ideas (Fodi) with a program centred on progressive global politics and activism.

    Titled Antidote, the two-day festival departs from Fodi in its inclusion of participatory arts programming and in its curatorial independence, with the St James Ethics Centre no longer returning as a presenting partner.

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    Dozens from official opposition party want a softer Brexit than is proposed by Theresa May’s government and Labour’s frontbench

    Dozens of Labour MPs are preparing to team up with the SNP, Plaid Cymru and the Greens to back an amendment to the Queen’s speech calling for Britain to remain in the EU customs union and single market.

    The politicians are hoping to coalesce around wording being put forward by Labour backbenchers, which lays out plans for a softer form of Brexit than is being proposed by both Theresa May’s government and their own frontbench.

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    The Royal Navy prepares to launch its largest and most powerful ship from its home port on Monday, in a highly delicate manoeuvre expected to take several hours. HMS Queen Elizabeth is a 280m, 65,000-tonne aircraft carrier, assembled in the port of Rosyth on Scotland’s Firth of Forth. She must traverse narrow basins and manoeuvre under three road and rail bridges to get out to the North Sea

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    When the 13-storey tower block toppled it exposed problems at the heart of the construction industry in a country where 400 residential buildings collapse each year

    Pensioner Madiha Abdel Alim was heading home to her flat in Alexandria when she looked up and noticed something strange: the 13-storey block in which she lived was suddenly tilting precariously over the narrow road.

    Concerned, she immediately contacted the local authorities. “They did nothing,” says Alim. “They said, ‘oh, that’s normal. It’s a very tall building’.” Three days later, the tower toppled and crashed into the building across the road.

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    With hundreds of thousands of visitors descending on the capital for the 150th Canada Day, this humble and unassuming city is flashing a bit of skin

    Ottawa is not a grand capital city. It lacks the stunning boulevards of Paris, or economic oomph of London. But it is a fitting capital for Canada all the same – or, at least, for the vision of the country many Canadians like to project: humble, unassuming, getting the job done in the shadow of more grandiose neighbours (in Ottawa’s case, Montreal and Toronto).

    The city’s Parliament Hill overlooks the Ottawa river valley which divides Ontario and Quebec, and where the lines between the nation’s two solitudes most obviously and frequently blur as a reminder of Canada’s unity.

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    The US supreme court has reversed lower court rulings, allowing the immigration order to take partial effect. Here’s what that means

    A watered-down version of the Trump administration’s “travel ban” is to take effect over the summer following a supreme court decision on Monday reversing a series of federal court rulings on the ban.

    The decision by the US’s highest court raises a number of questions about what the new ban will mean for people in the six Muslim-majority nations affected, as well as for a president who has been repeatedly stymied by the judiciary in the first five months of his administration.

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    • Elizabeth Wettlaufer pleaded guilty and admitted using insulin in killings
    • 14 assaults took place in Ontario care facilities and at a home, officials say

    A former nurse convicted of killing eight elderly people in her care has been sentenced to life imprisonment without possibility of parole for 25 years.

    Elizabeth Wettlaufer pleaded guilty last month to eight counts of first-degree murder, four counts of attempted murder and two counts of aggravated assault in the notorious serial killings. The 50-year-old told the court on Monday that she was truly sorry and hoped her victims’ families could find peace and healing.

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    Senate foreign relations committee chairman says Gulf nations have chosen to ‘devolve into conflict’ and says dispute undermines US efforts in Middle East

    The Republican chairman of the Senate foreign relations committee has said the US Congress will hold up approval of arms sales to the Gulf as a result of the Saudi-led blockade of Qatar.

    Senator Bob Corker said the nations of Gulf Cooperation Council had failed to take advantage of a summit with President Trump in May to overcome their differences and had “instead chosen to devolve into conflict”.

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    Gusty winds in Gulmarg uproot a huge pine tree that hits the cable of the coach, bringing it down to the ground

    Four Indian tourists and three local residents died when a cable car came crashing down from a height of at least 30 meters (100ft) in a tourist town in the Indian portion of Kashmir.

    Related: Kashmir conflict shifts with top militant vowing fight is for an Islamic state

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    The Tokyo-based car parts giant is facing lawsuits and huge costs over an airbag defect linked to at least 16 deaths globally

    Japan’s crisis-hit car parts maker Takata has filed for bankruptcy protection, after deadly faults in its airbags triggered the industry’s biggest ever safety recall.

    The Tokyo-based car parts giant is facing lawsuits and huge costs over an airbag defect linked to at least 16 deaths globally. News reports have said its liabilities would exceed 1tn yen ($9bn). Immediate confirmation was not available.

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    Clinton, Bush and Obama presidencies all had receptions to mark end of Muslim holy month

    Donald Trump has been criticised for not hosting an iftar dinner during Ramadan, breaking a nearly 20-year tradition.

    Despite events held by previous administrations from across the political divide, this year’s Ramadan – which began on 26 May – passed nearly unobserved by the White House. It was marked only by a statement published late on Saturday afternoon, coinciding with the end of the holy month.

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    Families affected by huge slip that buried Xinmo village say they are concerned by a lack of information and the fate of orphaned children

    Frustration grew on Monday among family members of victims of a landslide that buried a mountain village in southwestern China, with some complaining about a lack of information and asking why they had not been moved from an area prone to land slips.

    At least 93 people remain missing, along with 10 confirmed dead, after a landslide crashed down on the village of Xinmo, in mountainous Sichuan province, as dawn broke on Saturday.

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    Once the family breadwinner, Hossein Panahi was among 150 people who died when a bomb ripped through the Afghan capital in May. Now his kin are destitute, adding to the toll of lives wrecked by the country’s violence

    As an only son, Hossein Panahi was his family’s sole provider. He supplied his sisters with clothes, his ailing parents with food and medicine, and built them all a house to live in.

    His salary meant his two older sisters did not have to marry young for dowry, but could wait for men they loved. He also put his third sister through law school.

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    Sweden says Johan Gustafsson, who was kidnapped while on a motorcycle tour, was set free ‘a few days ago’ but declined to give any details on the negotiations

    A Swedish man kidnapped by Islamist militants in northern Mali nearly six years ago has been released from captivity, the Swedish government has confirmed.

    There was no immediate word on the fate of a second hostage, from South Africa, who was also seized in Timbuktu.

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    Decision to abandon landmark deal described as a ‘slap in the face’ and prompts charity to cancel gala event with Israeli PM

    A high-profile body that liaises between Israel and the Jewish diaspora has reacted with fury at a decision by the Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, to in effect abandon a plan to allow men and women to pray together at the Western Wall.

    The Jewish Agency has cancelled a gala dinner with Netanyahu in Jerusalem and is to discuss the ramifications of the decision at a meeting this week.

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    DNA study necessary to settle long-running claim by woman who says she is surrealist artist’s child, says Spanish ruling

    A Spanish court has ordered the remains of Salvador Dalí to be exhumed from his grandiose self-designed last resting place in an attempt to extract DNA for a paternity claim from a woman born in 1956.

    Pilar Abel, a tarot card reader and fortune teller from Girona, a city close to Figueres in north-east Spain where both she and the artist were born, has been trying for 10 years to prove that she is his only child and, therefore, under Spanish law, heir to a quarter of his fortune. Abel claims she was conceived during a secret liaison in 1955 and that her mother, Antonia, told her on several occasions that Dalí was her father. She has said the physical resemblance is so close “the only thing I’m missing is a moustache”.

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    Archaeologists find remains of building and skeleton of a crouching dog that appears to have died in the fire that destroyed it

    Digging for Rome’s new underground network has unearthed the charred ruins of an early 3rd-century building and the 1,800-year-old skeleton of a crouching dog that apparently perished in the same blaze that caused the structure to collapse.

    Archaeologists said on Monday that they had made the discovery on 23 May while examining a 10-metre (33-foot) hole bored near the city’s ancient Aurelian walls as part of construction work for the Metro C line.

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    US-Russia Business Council confirms farewell dinner for Kislyak, but foreign ministry spokeswoman says it’s up to Putin and the process would take months

    The Russian foreign ministry has denied reports that its ambassador to the US, Sergey Kislyak, is being recalled, even as plans for his departure are under way in Washington.

    Related: Who is Sergey Kislyak, the Russian ambassador rattling Trump's presidency? | David Smith and Spencer Ackerman

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    Breeder John Hume to take advantage of court ruling lift ban on domestic trade to sell horns trimmed from the 1,500 rhinos on his ranch

    A rhino breeder in South Africa is planning an online auction of rhino horns to capitalise on a court ruling that opened the way to domestic trade despite an international ban imposed to curb poaching.

    The sale of rhino horns by breeder John Hume, to be held in August, will be used to “further fund the breeding and protection of rhinos”, according to an auction website.

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    François Pinault, the billionaire luxury brand owner, will convert the 19th century Bourse de commerce into art museum with architect Tadao Ando

    It is the latest chapter in the art-world rivalry of two of France’s richest businessmen: a saga of momentous contemporary art collections and a quest by their owners to build Paris museums that would transform the city’s landscape.

    When the French luxury goods tycoon François Pinault– once described as the most powerful man in the modern art world – stepped out under the magnificent glass dome of the former Paris stock exchange on Monday to unveil the plans for his new modern art museum, the architecture world held its breath.

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    Cities such as Genoa and L’Aquila, formerly strongholds of the left, were claimed by the right in a pattern repeated across the country

    Italy’s centre-right parties trounced their centre-left rivals in mayoral elections, official results have showed – putting pressure on the ruling Democratic party (PD) ahead of a national vote due in less than a year. An alliance of Silvio Berlusconi’s Forza Italia party and the anti-immigrant Northern League won 55% of the votes in Genoa, the northern port city that was a leftwing stronghold but which the right will now govern for the first time in more than 50 years.

    PD leader Matteo Renzi, 42, who has been seeking to make a comeback since stepping down as prime minister in December, was the clear loser in Sunday’s vote, though polls show that his party is still one of Italy’s most popular nationally. “It could have gone better,” Renzi said in an early-morning Facebook post.

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    Legislation requiring doctor’s appointment is latest attack on women’s rights in Poland and violates shared EU values, says MEP

    The Polish government has been accused of launching a “sexual counter-revolution” that is an affront to European values after passing legislation reducing women’s access to the morning-after pill.

    A law signed off by the Polish president, Andrzej Duda, in defiance of human rights groups and European medicines agency guidelines turns emergency contraception into a prescription drug.

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    Sanders talked to the Guardian while on a tour to speak out unsparingly against the bill: ‘the most anti-working class legislation in the modern history of’ the US

    As Donald Trump celebrated the marriage of Wall Street executive-turned-treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin in the Washington swamp he repeatedly pledged to drain, Bernie Sanders stepped onstage in Pittsburgh.

    Related: ‘They’re sentencing me to death’: Medicaid recipients on the Republican healthcare plan

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    Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Microsoft announced Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism to focus on solutions, research and partnerships

    Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Microsoft have created a joint forum to counter terrorism following years of criticisms that the technology corporations have failed to block violent extremists and propaganda on their platforms.

    The Silicon Valley companies announced the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism on Monday, saying the collaboration would focus on technological solutions, research and partnerships with governments and civic groups.

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    • Body of Salvador Adame, abducted 18 May, found in Michoacán state
    • State has seen horrific levels of violence amid organised crime

    The body of a missing Mexican reporter has been found in the western state of Michoacán, bringing to seven the number of journalists murdered in the country this year.

    Salvador Adame, director of the local television station 6TV, was abducted 18 May in the city of Nueva Italia, some 400km west of Mexico City in a region known as Tierra Caliente, or the Hot Lands.

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    Move marks first major, public rebuke of China’s human rights record by Trump administration, which has generally avoided direct, public criticism of Beijing

    The Trump administration is poised to declare China among the world’s worst offenders on human trafficking, US officials said Monday, putting the world’s most populous country in the same category as North Korea, Zimbabwe and Syria,

    Related: Rex Tillerson: 'America first' means divorcing our policy from our values

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    Company did read emails in personal Gmail accounts to target users with tailored adverts but said it would stop

    Google will stop scanning the content of emails sent by Gmail users in an attempt to reassure business customers of the confidentiality of their communications.

    The company did read the emails in personal Gmail accounts in order to target users with personalised adverts but said in a blogpost it would stop doing so in order to “more closely align” its business and consumer products. Its business offering, part of G Suite, has never involved scanning emails.

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    Edi Rama’s Socialist party appears on course to win over 45% of vote after campaign focussed on closer ties with west

    Albania’s prime minister, the artist turned politician Edi Rama, is poised to be returned to power following parliamentary elections seen as key to the country’s future prospects of EU membership.

    As ballots continued to be counted on Monday, an exit poll showed Rama and his Socialist party on course to win between 45% and 49% of the vote.

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    Supreme court agrees to hear arguments on legality of controversial order in the fall after lifting significant elements of lower court orders to block ban

    The US supreme court handed a partial victory to the Trump administration on Monday as it lifted significant elements of lower court orders blocking the president’s controversial travel ban targeting visa applicants from six Muslim-majority countries.

    Related: Refugee admissions nearly halved as supreme court mulls Trump travel ban

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    Human rights groups and fellow dissidents react after Liu Xiaobo is transferred to hospital with late-stage liver cancer

    China’s dissident community has expressed anger, shock and sadness that the country’s best-known political prisoner – the democracy activist and Nobel peace prize winner Liu Xiaobo– has been transferred to hospital after being diagnosed with terminal liver cancer.

    Liu, 61, had been serving an 11-year prison sentence for inciting subversion of state power. His lawyer, Mo Shaoping, who has been in contact with Liu’s family, said he was now in the late stages of disease. Another of Liu’s lawyers, Shang Baojun, said he had been diagnosed on 23 May.

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    Republicans’ draft bill improves slightly on projections over next decade compared to similar legislation passed by House counterparts

    Twenty-two million Americans will lose health insurance coverage over the next 10 years under the draft Senate healthcare bill, according to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO).

    Related: ‘They’re sentencing me to death’: Medicaid recipients on the Republican healthcare plan

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